Exploring the history of Phoenix, Arizona, just for fun. Advertising-free, supported by my patrons on Patreon. Thank you!

Walking from Glendale to Peoria, Arizona


Yesterday I walked from Glendale, Arizona to Peoria, Arizona. They are two suburbs of Phoenix that originally were five miles apart. So, if you know the Phoenix area, and you know a little bit about its history, you would have been impressed if I told you that I walked from one little town to another 100 years ago. Yesterday, you wouldn't have been impressed, because the two cities meet in the center of 67th Avenue.

That is, when you walk across 67th Avenue, you start in Glendale, and when you get halfway you're in Peoria. I've lived in Glendale for a long time, and I've even seen the Peoria police cars turn left, while the Glendale police cars turn right. But make no mistake, if needs be, the two cities help each other out. It isn't as if the Glendale police would chase you to the city limits and stop!

When I lived in Los Angeles, it was a crazy patchwork of little towns that had grown together. Just a few decades before I lived there there were open spaces between the towns, but since those spaces have been gone for so long it's hard to say the moment when you leave Van Nuys and enter Canoga Park, for example. In fact, when I lived there I heard someone say that it was very convenient that the city of Los Angeles had divided itself up like that! I guess if you don't know the history, it looks like that.

Anyway, that's what happens with big cities, the towns that once were miles away grow to each other and touch. If I tried to walk from downtown Glendale, which is at 59th Avenue and Glendale, to downtown Peoria, which is at 83rd Avenue and Peoria, my little weak ankles wouldn't never make it. But going from the Glendale City Limits to the Peoria City Limits now just means crossing a street.

Nothing much changes as I cross the street. My phone tells me that I'm no longer in Glendale, and I'm told that the city sales tax is different (I don't pay attention to that kind of stuff!). There's a "Welcome to Peoria" sign that I walk past on my way to get my coffee at McDonald's, but otherwise Peoria looks just like Glendale.

But I get to say that I walked from one city to another, just to get my coffee in the morning!

Image at the top of this post: McDonald's in Peoria, Arizona. You can see Glendale if you look out the window, looking east.

If you liked this article, and would like to see more, please consider becoming a patron of History Adventuring on Patreon. If you're already a patron, thank you! You make this happen!

Click here to become a Patron!

History adventuring posts are shared there daily. The basic tier is a dollar a month, and the PhD tier, which includes "then and now" photos, billboards, aerials, videos, and super high-definition photos, is five dollars a month, and is discounted for seniors, veterans, and students.

Walking around the Sahuaro Ranch, Glendale, Arizona


Walk with me. Today we're going to the Sahuaro Ranch (yes, they misspell it that way), which is just north of Glendale Community College, which is at 59th Avenue and Olive in Glendale, Arizona. I've been there more times than I can count, and yes, I want to go back.

I find wonderful serenity there, but it's also a place of activity. I choose to go there when the activities, such as art shows, or weddings, or whatever, aren't going on because I'm kind of a dreamy person who wants to imagine what it all looked like 100 years ago.

The Ranch is only a few blocks from me, and it's right next door to where I worked, so it isn't as if it's very far away, and yet it feels millions of miles away when I'm there.

I took the photo at the top of this post as I was walking home from my dentist, which is on 51st Avenue and Olive. I walked through the neighborhood and entered on Mountain View. And the instant that I stepped through the arch on 59th Avenue (which has a wrought iron peacock on it) I felt better. There are trees, and shade, and grass. And yes, there are peacocks, and bunnies, and other little furry and feathery animals.

If you see me there, you may be wondering what I'm looking at. In my mind's eye I see the ranch as it was in the 1890s, when it was mostly surrounded by desert, and it was miles away from Glendale. Of course there weren't any convenient benches to sit on then, and if I were there I'd probably be working hard. Or maybe I'd be one of Bartlett's honored guests from back east, staying at the Guest House. Yeah, that's what I'd be, I don't know anything about farming and ranching! I'd just sit there and sip a mint julep, or whatever was being served at the time.

Thank you for visiting the Ranch with me!

Image at the top of this post: at the Sahuaro Ranch, just north of the Guest House. You're looking east.

If you liked this article, and would like to see more, please consider becoming a patron of History Adventuring on Patreon. If you're already a patron, thank you! You make this happen!

Click here to become a Patron!

History adventuring posts are shared there daily. The basic tier is a dollar a month, and the PhD tier, which includes "then and now" photos, billboards, aerials, videos, and super high-definition photos, is five dollars a month, and is discounted for seniors, veterans, and students.