Exploring the history of Phoenix, Arizona, just for fun. Advertising-free, supported by my patrons on Patreon. Thank you!

Visting the golden arches in Phoenix, Arizona in 1954


Let's time-travel back to 1954 Phoenix, Arizona, visit the golden arches, and get a hamburger, fries, and a Coke.

I understand that Ray Kroc started this place, and most people call it McDonald's, but I like to call it the golden arches, because that's what I see. It's right nearby the Indian School High School, on Central south of Indian School Road. Yes, it's kitty corner from the school.

The idea of "drive-ins" is really catching on, now that so many people have cars. The golden arches doesn't have an interior, you just walk up to the window, order what you want, and eat it in your car. Hamburgers are fifteen cents, and you can also get french fried potatoes, and Coca-Cola. Sounds good. You know, I developed a taste for Cokes in the service. Everywhere we went, Coca-Cola was always a nickel.

At the McDonalds in Phoenix in 1954, Central Avenue and Indian School Road

Yes, they cook everything right there in that little building, and serve it to you through the window. And yes, I know that there are occasionally crickets in the french fries, but who cares? Makes 'em crunchy!

Let's see now, I have a buck, that will be more than enough for both of us - I'll treat. But, uh, I don't have a car, could you drive?

Note: By the time I got to Phoenix, in 1977, this McDonalds was looking pretty sad. Other restaurants which had indoor seating, and air conditioning, were beating it, and soon a new McDonald's had to be built further east. Then an even bigger one was built on Indian School Road between 9th and 10th Street, the one that's still there now that serves the neighborhood.

The Indian School High School closed in 1990, and is now the Steele Indian School Park.

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