Exploring the history of Phoenix, Arizona and a little bit of Los Angeles and San Francisco, California. This blog is advertising-free, and is supported by my subscribers on Patreon. History adventuring posts are shared there daily. The basic tier is a dollar a month, and the PhD tier, which includes "then and now" photos, billboards, aerials, videos, and super high-definition photos, is five dollars a month, and is discounted for seniors, veterans, and students. If you're a subscriber, thank you! You make this happen!

Visiting the Sahuaro Ranch in Glendale, Arizona, and having lunch with the peacocks


One of the hidden gems of the Phoenix area is the Sahuaro Ranch (yes, it's misspelled that way), which has been there since the 1880s, and not only has beautifully-restored old buildings, it gives a wonderful feel for a 19th Century ranch in "the middle of nowhere", Glendale, Arizona. I'm fortunate in that I live right nearby it, as it's just north of Glendale Community College, which is at 59th Avenue and Olive. Let's have lunch with the peacocks.

The Sahuaro Ranch, Glendale, Arizona.

Peacock at the Sahuaro Ranch, Glendale, Arizona.

Since I like to "put my feet on the ground" to get a better feel for an historic area, I like to go there, not just read about it in books or on the web. When I go to historic places I squint my eyes a bit and time-travel back. At the Sahuaro Ranch I can see for hundreds of miles in every direction in my imagination. And while I can do this with just old photos, there's something magical that seems to happen when I have my feet on the ground, and am walking in the footsteps of the people who had been there over 100 years ago, like the owner of the ranch, William Bartlett. Of course the peacocks weren't there then, they didn't arrive until fifty years after the ranch was established, in the 1930s. All of the peacocks you see there now are descendants of the original ones.

Palm trees at the Sahuaro Ranch, Glendale, Arizona.

When you go there, I recommend that you spend some time in the rose garden, and under the palm trees. It's a wonderful feeling, that I really can't get enough of. If someone walks up to you and starts talking, just excuse yourself politely, and go spend some time with the peacocks.

Thank you for visiting the Sahuaro Ranch with me!

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History adventuring posts are shared there daily. The basic tier is a dollar a month, and the PhD tier, which includes "then and now" photos, billboards, aerials, videos, and super high-definition photos, is five dollars a month, and is discounted for seniors, veterans, and students.