Exploring the history of Phoenix, Arizona and a little bit of Los Angeles and San Francisco, California. This blog is advertising-free, and is supported by my subscribers on Patreon. History adventuring posts are shared there daily. The basic tier is a dollar a month, and the PhD tier, which includes "then and now" photos, billboards, aerials, videos, and super high-definition photos, is five dollars a month, and is discounted for seniors, veterans, and students. If you're a subscriber, thank you! You make this happen!

Phoenix, Arizona, a place to regain your health, and to live a long time


If you live in the Phoenix area, like I do, you will see a lot of elderly people, and a lot of hospitals. I live in Glendale, which isn't very far from Sun City, and believe me, I see a lot of people with grey, and white, hair. And Phoenix is where people have been coming for over 100 year to regain their health, and live longer. If you want to see evidence of that, just look around.

There are so many stories of people who came out to Phoenix to live out their last few years and then lived a long life that it's practically a cliche. My favorite is John C. Lincoln, and his wife. She had been diagnosed with tuberculoses, and they moved to Phoenix to help her to regain her health, which she did, and lived to be over 100 years old. John died in his 90s.

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From the Sister's Hospital (which became St. Joseph's) to John C. Lincoln Hospital to the Mayo Clinic, Phoenix has been a place of compassion, and hope. If you read old articles about how confident the boosters of Phoenix were about the health-giving aspects of the area, it seems a little silly. But they were right. And combined with state-of-the-art technology, which Phoenix has had for over 100 years, it does more than just give hope. It works.

So, if you live in the Phoenix area, settle in and prepare yourself for a long, long, life. It's a healthy place to live, for a long time!


Image above: 1918 article about the new St. Joseph's Hospital, which was on 4th Street and Polk, next to the old one. The new, new one was built in 1953.