This blog explores the history of Phoenix, Arizona and a little bit of Los Angeles and San Francisco, California. This blog is not supported by advertising, it's supported by the generosity of my patrons on Patreon. Thank you!

Understanding the theme of Phoenix history


My interest is in Phoenix history, and I tend to treat it as a theme. Since I'm a Graphic Designer, and have spent my whole life around artists and musicians, the idea of a theme comes naturally to me. I have discovered, however, that for some people it seems kinda strange. I'll see if I can explain my theme of Phoenix history.

An artistic, or musical, theme is simply a consistency throughout the piece. It doesn't mean the same thing over and over and over, but it means something that feels recognizable throughout. And so it's important to define what one's theme is. For me, Phoenix history is everything that ever happened, and ever will happen, in Phoenix. It could be something that most people understand as "history" - maybe a photo of bridge collapsing, or a politician giving a speech, or it could be the bowl of Cheerios that I just finished in my backyard this morning in Glendale.

I just love seeing, and hearing, variations on a theme. Of course, it the variation goes too far (the Cheerios thing is too far in my opinion), then the theme seems to get lost. So I vary the theme, because I enjoy that, but I try not to stray too terribly far. I'm interested in photos of Phoenix from 1872, and of the construction on the freeway just west of me. To me, it's all part of the theme of the history of Phoenix. And the people in it are all important players, from Theodore Roosevelt to the kid who just rolled by my house on his skateboard.

So that's the theme. I compose this like a work of art, or a symphony. The colors vary, the sounds swell, but it always refers back to the main theme. If you look for it, and listen, you will find it. If you haven't yet, please stick around. This is my opus, and if you like it, please sing along.


Image at the top of this post: Looking west on Washington from Central in 1872, Phoenix, Arizona.